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10.13.2020 (10 Days Ago)
Tuesday musings . . . and be careful because if you are around on Monday when I am writing, you could wind up the subject of my blog!
Your Best Advice, Please
Your Best Advice, Please
10 days ago 7 comments Categories: Lifestyle Tags:

 

What advice would you give – or better yet, did you give – last time you helped someone draft a cover letter?

 

My son is getting ready to apply for summer internships.  He is a college junior studying chemical engineering (with a nuclear engineering minor) and has a strong interest in energy.

 

At this point, he is diligently working on cover letters. Who better to reach out to for advice than the accomplished professionals that comprise our Gotham family?

 

So, what would you say are the top three “dos” and “don’ts” for a college student’s cover letter? What have you seen that either blew you away – or made you want to throw the cover letter away?

 

OK, I will start:


1. Typos, grammatical errors, that sort of thing, send the cover letter to the “no” pile.

2. Failing to connect the cover letter to the job requirements, also a problem.

3. Getting my name right and demonstrating some knowledge about the work that we do, a big plus for me.

 

What do you think?

...
Comments
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  •  Fred wrote 10 Days Ago (positive) 
     
    1
    Research person letter is being sent to and based thereon try to make mention of a personal connection, eg, "I am also left-handed and think on the right side of my brain."
     
       
     
     
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  •  Daniel_Schwartz wrote 9 Days Ago (neutral) 
     
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    Use Linked In to get intel on person you are sending as well as the company they work for. Typos and using correct grammar are huge in my book. Have someone like yourself proof read before sending out. Just be real and not too wordy. Sometimes less is better.
     
       
     
     
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  •  Corey_Bearak wrote 9 Days Ago (positive) 
     
    1
    Generally active tense verbs and shorter sentences. keep paragraphs short. No more than 3-4 sentences. Use at least 14pt type. It all makes for an easy read.
     
       
     
     
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  •  David_Abeshouse wrote 9 Days Ago (neutral) 
     
    0
    I agree with Fred's and Dan's and Corey's comments above. Also: Make yourself stand out, in a good way -- be a bit unique, to catch the reader's attention. Don't just summarize your resume; rather, place it in context -- the resume tells "what" so the cover letter can tell "why." Speak affirmatively about what you can do for them, both substantively and procedurally (by the latter, I mean that you're easy to get along with, you learn quickly, and want to help as a team player).
     
       
     
     
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  •  ShelleySimpson wrote 9 Days Ago (neutral) 
     
    0
    David hit on something that is imperative for the cover letter and subsequent interview. What value does he bring to the table? What can he do that nobody else can? How will he make life easier for the prospective "employer?" This reminds me of one of the best hires I ever made! A story for another day ...
     
       
     
     
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  •  Phyllis_Dubrow wrote 9 Days Ago (neutral) 
     
    0
    Visuals count: Use good, bond paper (for the envelope, too). Format the letter on the page and paragraphs within the letter so that they look professional. Don't use Calibri or whatever the default Word font is.

    For content: Make it sound like a letter, not a form letter.
     
       
     
     
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  •  CarlyMeyer wrote 9 Days Ago (neutral) 
     
    0
    I like everything above. I'm into personal touches. Creating a personal connection, in a smart and clever way, invokes emotional response in the reader, while addressing how his abilities will fill the need and more.
     
       
     
     
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Guest Comments
I think they are less important than you think. If they are badly written that is significant. If they are fine then I dont think they are given much weight. However If they mention someone connected to the person that you are sending it to or the business i.e. So and So suggested I forward my resume etc. I also believe they should request an interview or an opportunity to meet with the person.

Posted By : Donna LESLIE Levine

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